Monday, October 10, 2016

Habits of Work > Getting things done


Habits of Work
Getting things done > Breadth Studio Activities

Goal Concept:
Understand and be able to cultivate creativity strategies and improve time management.
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Access Prior Knowledge:
“Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.” ~Vincent Van Gogh

Instructional Strategy
  • Identify similarities and differences
Learning Activity

Instructional Strategy
  • Deepen Understanding
Learning Activity

New Information:
Paul Cézanne, painter.
Yves Saint Laurent, fashion designer.

Habits of Work - by Prof. Rusty Smith

Self Reliance:
Self-reliance is an active approach in which an individual drives their own learning and working process.  Rather than waiting for directions or blaming others for delays, individuals actively generates possibilities, weighs benefits, and makes choices.
Paul Cézanne, painter.

Organized Persistence:
Beating your head against a brick wall is an example of mindless persistence.  It may take weeks, but eventually organized persistence results in a solution.  It gives us the ability to prevail, even when faced with the most daunting task.

Daily Practice:
Momentum is extremely powerful when you are working on a difficult problem.  Daily practice helps maintain momentum.  For example, when learning a new computer program, practicing for a couple of hours each night is better than working one full day a month.    

Appropriate Speed:
Some tasks are best completed quickly, with brisk decision making and decisive action.  Slowing down to reframe a question and weigh alternative solutions is necessary in other cases.  Knowing when to speed up and when to slow down is one mark of a ‘master learner.’

Incremental Excellence:
Most design problems are best developed in a series of stages.  Ideas evolve, skills improve, compositions are distilled.  Rather than trying for the ‘perfect solution’ on the first day, it is better to just start with a draft.

Valuing Alternative Viewpoints:
Listening to others, understanding diverse points of view, and considering alternatives expands our capacity to solve a wide variety of problems.  Even when the advice is off base, we can often use the idea as a springboard into a fresh approach.    

Direct Engagement:
Talk is cheap.  Work is hard.  The only way to solve most design problems is to get involved.  You will never win a race when you are standing on the sidelines.  

Learn More:

Art References:
Yoshitomo Nara, artist.
Apply Knowledge and Skills:

Create > Expressive Hands

B-handsMichelle

Goal:  Accurately render human hands that convey expression

Studio Activity:
Select one of the options below.  
  1. Use Pen & Ink, Conté Crayon, or Soft Pastel or Oil Pastel.  You may choose color using realistic skin tones or crazy colors or B/W.  
  2. But be aware that drawing hands are THE most difficult part of the human body to draw. Many student artists go to great lengths to avoid drawing them. They’re just so COMPLICATED and if anything is off, even a little bit, it’s painfully obvious. However, once you’ve mastered drawing hands, you can add that to your superpowers. Remember, “draw what you SEE, not what your brain thinks it should look like.”



hands



Look at the NEGATIVE SPACE between the fingers!
Get those shapes right and you will also have drawn the hand correctly.
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Click HERE > http://artists.pixelovely.com/practice-tools/hands-feet-practice/  for an amazing website that provides hands poses that you can use for practice!

Studio Activity Option 1:  
1 GIANT Hand

Instructions:
  1. The position of the hand must be “difficult”- fingers bent, slanted, foreshortened, etc.  No fists, open palms, etc.
  2. The hand may be holding something- but make it a significant object and it can’t be so large that it hides too much of the hand.
  3. Don’t forget about the negative space- the space around and behind the hand.  Put something in the background- a tone, a pattern, something!
  4. As always, contrast is important.

AP Studio Art student’s examples of this option:
C-woodenhand
carlos
C-hands-ink
B-AngelHands

B-Hand2
C-HandGrip
C-HandJairo
C-hands-baby

C-pencil
B BLUE HAND
B-Handd
B-piano hands
B-SheryHAND
B-WATCHARM
C-HAND ON GROUND
C-HAND TATOOES
C-OPENHAND
C-PEARLS
Jennifer01
JessicaHANDS
LeoHANDS
Sarany002

Studio Activity Option 2:
Two Big hands

Instructions:
  1. Hands must be touching or interacting in some way.  They may overlap, interlock, clasp, snuggle, etc. If the hands don’t at least overlap, it will affect your grade.
  2. Use the positioning of the 2 hands to tell a story, show meaning or convey emotion.
  3. Consider contrasting expressions or character in the hands (tense vs relaxed, active vs passive, bony and angular vs fleshy and round, rough vs smooth, old vs young etc…)
  4. Don’t forget about the negative space- the space around and behind the hands.  Put something in the background- a tone, a pattern, something!
  5. As always, contrast is important.

AP Studio Art student’s examples of this option:
B-handsMichelle
B-HandsPerla
B-handsairo
C-handsJairo

C-green soft pastel
C-bow hands
B-Re-Hands
b-pull my finger

B-Jairo Hands
Jared 2 hands
Vanessa12
Susana001

NikielHANDS
N-LEHANDS
maggie01 copy
M006

LeslieL
Kris
Kim008
Jennifer008

Jennifer005
Jennifer004
Jennifer03
Jackie010

DSCF1141
B-RomeHands
B-pinky promise
B-JedHANDS

B-Jankleyhands sensual radioactive
B-Jankleyhand holding wrist red blue
B-handsx
B-hands raudra

B-hands marriage
B-hands BANG
B-cool hands
B-COMRADE

B Hands

Studio Activity Option 3:
Five hands

Instruction:
  1. Explore a variety of hand positions.  
  2. Draw each one from a very different angle and doing something very different.
  3. Create firm, solid forms with a clear sense of the structural anatomy and volume. Use block, cylinders, planes freely to help figure out the structure and firm-up forms.
  4. Explore different approaches and various degrees of finish.  There’s no need to draw them all the same way; a little variety is a good thing.
  5. Arrange the hands to compose the whole page in an aesthetically pleasing way. Composition is vital.
  6. Don’t forget about the negative space- the space around and behind the hands.  Put something in the background- a tone, a pattern, something!
  7. As always, contrast is important.

AP Studio Art student’s examples of this option:
B Ruby 5 Hands
B-DSC_9993
B-Brayanhands

Susana007
B*-5Hands
B-FiveHands

B-5hands

Studio Activity Option 4:  
Hands in action

Instruction:
  1. For this option you may include more of the arms and body to make the action clear.
  2. Objects may also be included.




AP Studio Art student’s examples of this option:
B-Hands senior
C-paintinghand
C-siyou hand
C-green hands

C-THREEHANDS
C-DSC_0636
B-handstea
C-WHY IS HE BLEEDING PAINT OH NOES Dx

C-SALON HANDS
C-RUBBERBANDHAND
C-King
C-CAMERA & HAND

C-BADMINTON
B-conte hands spray can
Vanessa12
Vanessa11

Vanessa10
Vanessa08
Vanessa07
Vanessa04

Vanessa03
Vanessa01
Susana010
N-SINK

Susana002
Susana008
Susana009
Jennifer010

Jennifer009
Jennifer007
Jennifer006
DSCF1128

B-Hands

Some amazing hands paintings and drawings by the “Masters”
Praying_Hands_-_Albrecht_Durer
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Durer_Boy_s_Hands_1506

4b8bafe55bc67bba39cca35f07654700
3819fe4ab9a578f390386304b2bf5833
eb293a3a113338e19afd574a4cf1874e

594187250f94cb35b79ca3ebab6741ff
hands
92aa9df50495b670a39fc2911c54d5e3

2fb501b80da2db01cf678b82ca288314
a721e6033e78e326ae7dcb17958affbc
6c466a2b014ac6b156ef37813a9dda76

Some tutorials with tips and general guidelines for drawing hands:
53334d8e0a7e9cc741af6671338da632
Tom-Richmond-Hands
fd7a82fc645a2f166e00f875fc4814f1nk-chan-Short-Hand-TutorialRon-Lemen-Drawing-the-Human-Hand
10e0dee6cdda5fc30b0740b6809f47e6161d8654a56da823ba708f879d9ce10d9870d22dbbd143fdab515785b2f75994uchuucacahuate-How-to-Draw-Hands


This lesson is from Abby Saniamo at Maryland Institute, College of Art. http://abbysangiamo.com/artistsNotes.html


Generalize, Reflect & Publish:
Instructional Strategy
  • Evaluate the results
Learning Activity
Reflect > Should I go back and rework anything?
  • How did you combine art elements (line, color, shape, texture, value)  to develop art principles? (Unity/variety, balance, emphasis contrast, rhythm, proportion/scale, figure/ground relationship)
  • Where are the dominant shapes, forms, colors, or textures that carry expressive significance?
  • Why Is the work ordered and balanced or chaotic and disturbing?
  • What gives the work its uniqueness?
  • Is symbolism used in the work to convey meaning other than what one sees?
  • Does the work evoke any feelings?

Instructional Strategy
  • Providing Recognition
Learning Activity
Publish > Share your album to our G+Community > Concepts & Creations category
Display > Add your photos to the Event

Instructional Strategy
  • Providing Feedback
Learning Activity
Critique >
  • Give positive feedback > +1 every image that deserves it
  • Give peer feedback > Give 2 peer images a VTS critique > http://goo.gl/1WWmBY
Self-assess >