Monday, December 11, 2017

Create > Image of Humans


Create > Image of Humans


Goal:  Portray a human activity by making a symbolic wire sculpture.

Catalysts:  
Animate, empathize, fantasize  

Studio Activity:  
Portray a particular image of man; Man the Inventor, the Artist, the Sportsman, the Magician, the Hunter and so on.  Interpret the concept with wire.  Use any type or types of flexible wire (even a coat hanger will work) to create a three-dimensional sculpture.  Add additional elements to further emphasize the theme: clock parts, transistors, pills, ruler, map, mechanical parts… Mount the wire sculpture on a wood base and title appropriately.


Artist Profile:


Be inspired by the works of Rachel Ducker > http://www.rachel-ducker.co.uk/ British contemporary artist Rachel Ducker is well practiced in life drawing and with an appreciation of the human form and the emotional dynamics of human nature.  Originally trained as a jeweller, Rachel experiments with wire as a media for sculpting the human form, capturing something ephemeral, either emotive or active.  






Be  further inspired by the works of Gavin Worth > https://www.gavinworth.com/index.html


Visual Examples:

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Tutorial > Glamour Photo Touch Up



Tutorial > Glamour Photo Touch Up

Step 1
Create a duplicate layer of your image.

Step 2:
On the duplicate layer delete everything except the skin.
Erase the detail sections with 30-50% opacity eraser.

 
Step 3:
Select skin on the duplicate layer (CTRL+ click on layer thumbnail in Layers Pallet)
Run Filter>Noise>Median.

4. Change the Layer Mode to Luminosity - The Opacity is at 100% and needs to be turned down for a more realistic look.


Step 5:
The Opacity has been brought down to 65%

Extra Tip #1
You could also duplicate the "skin" layer and change the Layer Mode to Soft Light for a warmer feel.
Extra Tip #2
Or create an quick tan by changing the second skin layer to Multiply. (bring the Opacity down to less than 50%)

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Tutorial > Blend Two Photos Like a Hollywood Movie Poster

Tutorial > Blend Two Photos Like a Hollywood Movie Poster

In this Photoshop photo effects tutorial, we're going to take a couple of photos and blend them together Hollywood movie poster-style. Blending photos together is very easy to do in Photoshop thanks to layer masks, yet finding two photos with similar colors isn't always so easy, and you end up with an effect that doesn't really seem to look right because the colors don't match.
With this technique, you don't need to worry about the colors in the images at all because we'll be removing them completely and adding our own color to blend the two photos seamlessly.

Here's the first photo I'll be using:
Here's the image I want to blend it with:
And here's what the final effect will look like:
Let's get started.
Step 1: Drag One Image Into The Document Window Of The Other Image
The first thing we need in order to blend our two images together is for them to both be in the same document. To do that, with both of my images open on the screen in their own separate document windows, I'm going to grab my Move tool from the Tools palette, or I could press the letter V on my keyboard to quickly select it:
Photoshop tutorial: Select the Move tool from the Tools palette, or press "V" for the keyboard shortcut.
Then with my Move tool selected, I'm going to click anywhere inside the image of the couple walking on the beach to make that document window active, and I'm simply going to drag the image into the other document window:
Photoshop tutorial: Click inside the first photo and drag it into the document window of the second photo.
When I release my mouse button, both images appear inside the same document, one on top of the other:
Photoshop tutorial: The two photos now appearing in the same document.
I can also see both images now on their own separate layers in the Layers palette:
Photoshop tutorial: Photoshop's Layers palette showing each image on its own separate layer.
Step 2: Resize And/Or Reposition The Images As Needed
Now that I've dragged the beach photo into the other document, I need to resize it, and I can do that easily with Photoshop's Free Transform command. With the beach photo layer selected in the Layers palette, I'm going to use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+T (Win) / Command+T (Mac) to bring up the Free Transform box and handles around the image.
Problem is, this image is in "landscape" mode, meaning its width is longer than its height, and I've dragged it into a document containing an image that's in "portrait" mode (its height is longer than its width), so even though Photoshop has placed the Free Transform box and handles around my image, I can't see any of the corner handles because the sides of the image are extending out beyond the viewable area of the document.
To fix that, all I need to do is press Ctrl+0 (Win) / Command+0 (Mac) to fit everything onto the screen:
Photoshop tutorial: Press "Ctrl+0" (Win) / "Command+0" (Mac) to fit everything, including the Free Transform handles, onto the screen.
Now that I can see my corner handles, I can resize my image by dragging any of the corner handles inward in order to fit more of the image into the viewable document area. Since I don't want to distort the image, I'm going to hold down my Shift key as I'm dragging the handles to constrain the width and height proportions:
Photoshop tutorial: Hold down "Shift" and drag any of the corner handles inward to resize the image and fit more of it into the viewable area.
When I'm happy with the new size of my image, I'm going to press Enter (Win) / Return (Mac) to accept the transformation.
The beach image looks good, but the image of the couple behind it needs to be moved up higher. Again, there's a slight problem. The image is on the Background layer:
Photoshop tutorial: The original image on the Background layer.
If I select the layer in the Layers palette and then click inside the document and try to drag the image up with my Move tool, Photoshop is going to complain and give me this pop-up message:
Photoshop tutorial: A warning message telling me that Photoshop can't move the image on the Background layer because the layer is locked.
The warning message is telling me that Photoshop can't move the image because the layer is locked, and the reason it's locked is because it's the Background layer. Photoshop treats Background layers differently from normal layers, and one of the things you can't do with images on the Background layer is move them. To get around that problem, all we need to do is rename the Background layer, and the quickest way to do that is to simple hold down Alt (Win) / Option (Mac) and double-click directly on the word "Background". Photoshop will automatically rename the layer "Layer 0":
Photoshop tutorial: Hold down "Alt" (Win) / "Option" (Mac) and double-click directly on the word "Background" to rename the Background layer "Layer 0".
Just like that, the layer is no longer a special Background layer, and we're now free to move the image on the layer. With my Move tool still selected, I'm going to click inside the document and drag the photo of the couple up higher. Since I want to make sure I'm dragging straight up and not accidentally dragging the image a little off to either side, I'm going to once again hold down my Shift key as I'm dragging:
Photoshop tutorial: Dragging the bottom image upward using the Move tool.
Step 3: Add A Layer Mask
Once you've resized and/or repositioned your photos in the document the way you like them, we can begin blending them together. The first thing we need is a layer mask, and we're going to add it to the layer on top ("Layer 1"), which is my case is the layer containing the beach photo, so I'm going to click on that layer in the Layers palette to select it. Then, click on the Add A Layer Mask icon at the bottom of the Layers palette:
Photoshop tutorial: Click on the top layer to select it in the Layers palette, then click on the "Add A Layer Mask" icon.
We can now see the layer mask thumbnail added to the top layer:
Photoshop tutorial: The layer mask thumbnail in the Layers palette.
Notice that the layer mask thumbnail has a white highlight border around it. That's telling us that the layer mask, not the layer itself, is currently selected, which is what we want.
Step 4: Drag Out A Black to White Gradient On The Mask To Blend The Two Images
Select your Gradient tool from the Tools palette, or press G to quickly access it with the keyboard shortcut:
Photoshop tutorial: Select the Gradient tool.
Then, up in the Options Bar at the top of the screen, click on the down-pointing arrow to the right of the gradient preview area, which will bring up the Gradient Picker. Click on the black to white gradient in the top row, third from the left to select it:
Photoshop tutorial: Select the black to white gradient, third from the left, top row.
Click anywhere else on the screen to close out of the Gradient Picker once you've selected the gradient. Then, back in your document, hold down your Shift key and drag out a black to white gradient to blend the two images together. Because you're dragging the gradient on the layer mask, not the layer itself, you won't see your gradient. Instead, you'll see the two images blend together. Start at the top of where you want the transition from one image to the other to begin, which in my case is the top of the beach photo, and drag down to the point where you want the transition to end. I want my transition to end where the water and land meet, so I'm going to click just below the top of my beach photo and drag straight down to just above the water line:
Photoshop tutorial: Dragging the gradient from just below the top of the beach photo to just above the top of the water line to set the transition area between the two photos.
Release your mouse button, and the two images blend together at the location where you dragged out the gradient:
Photoshop tutorial: The two images now fade from one into the other thanks to the black to white gradient we added to the layer mask.
If you're not happy with how your two images have blended together, simply press Ctrl+Z (Win) / Command+Z Mac to undo and try dragging the gradient again.
Step 5: Merge Both Layers Onto A New Layer
With "Layer 1" still selected in the Layers palette, press Shift+Ctrl+Alt+E (Win) / Shift+Command+Option+E (Mac) to merge both layers onto a new layer above it, which Photoshop will name "Layer 2":
Photoshop tutorial: Merge both layers onto a new layer at the top of the Layers palette.
Step 6: Desaturate The Layer
We're going to remove all the color from the image at this point so we can add our own color, which we'll do in a moment. To remove the colors, press Shift+Ctrl+U (Win) / Shift+Command+U (Mac) to desaturate the layer:
Photoshop tutorial: Press "Shift+Ctrl+U" (Win) / "Shift+Command+U" (Mac) to desaturate the image, removing the colors.
Step 7: Add Noise
Let's add a little noise to the image to help the two photos blend more seamlessly together. Go up to the Filter menu at the top of the screen, choose Noise, and then choose Add Noise. This brings up the Add Noise dialog box. Set the Amount to somewhere between 2-6% depending on the pixel dimensions of your image. I'm working on a low resolution image for this tutorial, so I'm going to set mine to 2% just to add a hint of noise. Make sure Distribution is set to Gaussian, and also make sure the Monochromatic option at the very bottom is checked:
Photoshop tutorial: Add a bit of noise to the image to help blend the two photos together.
Step 8: Add A Solid Color Adjustment Layer
All that's left to do is add our own color to the image. For that, we're going to use a Solid Color fill layer. Click on the New Fill Or Adjustment Layer icon at the bottom of the Layers palette:
Photoshop tutorial: Click the "New Fill Or Adjustment Layer" icon.
Then select Solid Color from the top of the list that appears:
Photoshop tutorial: Select the Solid Color fill layer from the list.
Photoshop's Color Picker will appear. Choose the color that you want to use for your image. I'm going to select a light orange for my color:
Photoshop tutorial: Choose a color to use for your image from the Color Picker.
Click OK once you've chosen a color to exit out of the Color Picker. Don't worry about choosing the "right" color at the moment because you can always change it later.
Step 9: Set The Layer Blend Mode To "Color"
After clicking out of the Color Picker, your image will now be filled completely with the color you chose, which isn't exactly what we wanted. To fix that, with the new Solid Color fill layer selected in the Layers palette, go up to the Blend Mode option in the top left corner of the Layers palette, click on the down-pointing arrow to the right of the word "Normal", and select Color from the list:
Photoshop tutorial: Change the blend mode of the Solid Color fill layer to "Color".
Your image will now be colorized with your chosen color rather than being blocked from view by it. If you decide you're not happy with the color you chose, just double-click on the Solid Color fill layer's color swatch icon in the Layers palette:
Photoshop tutorial: Double-click the color swatch icon in the Layers palette.
When you do that, the Color Picker will pop back up and you can choose a different color. Since the Solid Color fill layer is already set to the "Color" blend mode, you'll be able to see a live preview of how your current color choice looks with your image.
I'm going to stick with my initial color selection, and here, after changing the blend mode to "Color", is my final result:
Photoshop tutorial: The final result.

Monday, November 27, 2017

Create > Name Totem

Create > Name Totem


Goal:  Create a sculpture from letters

Catalysts:  
animate, empathize, fantasize

Studio:  Stylize the letters of your name, varying the design and shape of each letter.  Trace each letter to a slab of Styrofoam or wood or cardboard and cut out with a knife or hacksaw blade.  Decorate each letter in a different manner.  For example paint one, wrap one with twin, glue sand to one…  Figure out how to stack the letters vertically to form a totem.

Be inspired by Robert Indiana > http://robertindiana.com/ , one of the preeminent figures in American art since the 1960s, has played a central role in the development of assemblage art, hard-edge painting and Pop art. A self proclaimed “American painter of signs,” Indiana has created a highly original body of work that explores American identity, personal history and the power of abstraction and language, establishing an important legacy that resonates in the work of many contemporary artists who make the written word a central element of their oeuvre.